• writing samples available upon request

  • books & chapters in books

    books & chapters in books

    The Evidence of Things Not Seen, in The New New Corpse, Chicago: Green Lantern Press, 2015

    Roundtable discussion in The Handbook of Textile Culture, edited by Janis Jefferies, Diana Wood Conroy and Hazel Clark, London: Bloomsbury, 2015.

    The Baartman Diaries, foreword by Carla Williams, essay by Fo Wilson, Chicago: Studio W Editions, 2013 (purchase here)

    “Seeing Black and the Color of Form and Domestic Bodies,” in Diasporic Women’s Writings of the Black Atlantic: (En)Gendering Literature and Performance. Emilia María Durán-Almarza and Esther Álvarez-López, editors, New York: Routledge, 2013.

    100 Assignments: The Future of the Foundation Course in Art and Design, Paris France: Paris College of Art Press (PCA), 2013

  • selected published exhibition essays & reviews

    selected published exhibition essays & reviews

    It's All Wrong Tom, Tom Loeser: It Could Have Been Kindling, West Bend, WI: Museum of Wisconsin Art, 2015.

    “A ‘Remix’ of Diva Cool at 331/2 RPM,” International Review of African American Art, Vol. 24, No.2., 2013

    “Seeing Black and the Color of Representation,” NKA: Journal of Contemporary African Art, Vol. 2011, No. 29, Fall/Winter 2011.

    “The Changing Face of Craft,” International Review of African American Art, Vol. 22, No.2, 2009

    "On Walls and the Walkers," International Review of African American Art, Vol. 20, No.3, 2006

    "The Maker as Evidence," The Maker's Hand: American Studio Furniture, 1940-1990, Studio 3, The Furniture Society, October 2005

    "The Dissolution of 'Black Art?, An Exhibition and Book," International Review of African American Art, Vol. 19, No.2, 2003

    "The Short Century: Independence and Liberation Movements in Africa, 1945-1994," P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center and MOMA, International Review of African American Art, Vol. 18, No.4, 2002

    "Looking for Miles Davis: The Search to Articulate an African American Design Aesthetic," Communication Arts, Photography Annual, 2002

  • curatorial essays

    The New Materiality: Digital Dialogues at the Boundaries of Contemporary Craft
    The Fuller Craft Museum, Brockton, MA
    May 29 - February 6, 2011
    Curator, Fo Wilson

    Bodies of Evidence: Contemporary Perspectives
    The RISD Museum of Art, Providence, RI
    July 1- September 25, 2005
    Co-curators Jan Howard and Fo Wilson

    Visual Perceptions: Twenty-two African American Designers Challenge Modern Stereotypes
    Parsons School of Design Gallery, NY, 1991
    Co-curators, Michele Washington and Fo Wilson

  • selected bibliography

    "Onward Fo!, Anita Bateman, The International Review of African American Art, June 12, 2015.

    "Sara’s Story in her Own Words with a Message for Today’s Video Girls,” Margaret Rose Vendryes, The International Review of African American Art, June 12, 2015.

    "Performing Tables,” Caroline Picard, Art Slant, March 25, 2015.

    “Profile: Fo Wilson,” Liz Glass, Art Practical, March 9, 2012.

    “The New Materiality: Digital Dialogues at the Boundaries of Contemporary Craft,” Kate Smith, The Journal of Modern Craft, Vol. 4, Issue 3, November 2011.

    “Progeny II-On Art, Family Race & Culture,” Frank Martin, The Daily Serving, January 2011.

    "Data Processing"
    Christy DeSmith, American Craft, Dec/Jan 2011

    "When Handmade Meets Digital, Sparks Fly"
    Cate McQuaid, The Boston Globe, June 20, 2010

    "Craft Goes Digital"
    Bill Van Siclen, The Providence Journal, July 11, 2010

    “From Sarah Baartman to Li’l Kim”
    R. Shabaka, International Review of African American Art, Vol. 22, No.2, 2009

    “Art Scene: Art, Sex and Politics Intersect at RISD Museum Show”
    Bill Van Siclen, The Providence Journal, August 11, 2005

    “Art Scene: Fiber and Furniture”
    Bill Van Siclen, The Providence Journal, March 31, 2005

    Women Designers in the U.S.A.: Diversity and Difference, 1900-2000
    Pat Kirkham (Editor), Yale University Press, 2001

    Clean New World
    Maud Lavin, MIT Press, 2001

    Mixing Messages: Graphic Design in Contemporary Culture
    Ellen Lupton, Princeton Architectural Press, 1996

    “What Is It? Searching for a Black Aesthetic in American Graphic Design”
    Sylvia Harris, International Review of African American Art, Spring 1996

    Design in Depth
    DK Holland, Michael Bierut and William Drenttel (Editors),
    Rockport Publishers, 1996

    “In Search of Cultural Equity”
    Laural Harper, Communication Arts, March/April 1995

    “A Hurting on Their Souls: How the African Experience Defines an American Aesthetic”
    Mary Ann French, The Washington Post, November 17, 1994

  • academic papers


    CONTEMPORARY ART
    Laylah Ali's Enigmatic Narratives
    Essay, the work of visual artist Layla Ali.

    Carol Duncan: Art Historian as Progressive, Social-politicist & Feminist Critic
    Review, "The Aesthetics of Power: Essays in Critical Art History" by Carol Duncan.

    "Review: Art on My Mind"
    Review, cultural critic bell hooks' 1994 book.

    AFRICAN CONTINUITIES AND MATERIAL CULTURE
    Ancestry, Evolution & Memory: Central African Funerary Art and Practice and its Evolution in the United States and Cuba
    This paper advances a concept of "harmonic dualism" as an integral facet of African identity in regards to funerary art and practice of the Kongo people of Central Africa and its legacy in the United States and Cuba. It examines Kongo art and tradition, how it was effected by colonial interests and the Atlantic slave trade, and how the intersection of African and European culture and religion contributed to its evolution in the Americas. It explores how Kongo culture and ideographic language find expression in Afro-colonial funerary traditions and asks what evolution of these traditions and practices do we find as part of a continuum in Diasporic art and culture in the American present?

    Object as Storyteller: Investigations into Evidence of African Traditions in African American Material Culture
    This paper investigates African cultural continuity and practices within African American culture by tracing the history and uses of a simple, 18th century pewter spoon. This artifact was recovered in a riverbank deposit from an archeological site and is part of the collection of the South Seaport Museum in New York.